Bauer Skates

A buyer's guide for popular Bauer models

Bauer Skates

Bauer has long been a leader in the development of hockey equipment, including ice skates. From the affordable Supreme One20 to top-of-the-line Vapor APX, Bauer models have been lauded by amateurs and pros alike for their use of high-tech materials, their lightweight feel and their comfort.

Users say Bauer skates and the innovations integrated into them have allowed for faster acceleration and quick turns, among other performance improvements. Some models offer a tongue that is customizable for stiffness and comfort. Others feature a high-tech runner design that dramatically cuts the weight.

Bauer has been involved in revolutionary equipment designs for a long time. The Bauer family established the company in 1927, and way back when, it was the first firm to manufacture hockey skates that had a blade permanently attached to the boot.

That type of innovation continues to this day. The Bauer Vapor APX is considered by many to be the best ice skate there is, at any level. They’re comfortable, durable and ultra responsive. And they employ the latest technology and designs. It’s the choice among many a die-hard rink rat.

But there are plenty of other choices in the Bauer line for all skill levels who are looking for models at various price points but who still want the quality of the Bauer brand. Plus, the company offers inline skates for when ice isn’t available.

Here are some of the most popular Bauer models:
 

Vapor APX

The Vapor line

Vapor APX -- This is Bauer’s flagship skate, combining top-of-line materials with cutting-edge technology to offer the lightest Vapor product the company has ever manufactured. Made for advanced players, it features a new X-rib construction and the ALIVE composite found in the popular TotalOne product line. Those who own the Vapor APX report that its performance is stellar. The price tag ranges around $800.

Vapor x7.0 -- These skates have advanced performance features, including the X-rib design providing the support and stability needed by agile, quick players. The x7.0 replaces the X:60. The x7.0 also has a light, abrasion-resistant quarter panel, Bauer's Hydra Max liner, as well as other features such a tongue with a lace-bite channel, metatarsal guard and a footbed that is said to provide an outstanding fit. The senior version of this model typically can be purchased for around $600 while the junior version goes for about $350.

Vapor x4.0 -- This is a extremely popular intermediate-level skate that is a little more forgiving -- not as stiff -- so users who are adept but are still picking up of the finer points of moving around on the ice can develop their craft. The Vapor x4.0 is a solid performer at a good value. Prices tend to range around $200 for senior versions, and $150 for juniors.

Vapor x3.0 -- A model for the recreational skater, but one that still offers some high-end features such as a felt tongue with a metatarsal guard as well as the high-tech LS2 blade holder. The price tag is generally around $144.95 for senior x3.0s, about $100 for the juniors.

Vapor x1.0 -- This may be the entry-level model to the Vapor line, but it still features the X-rib pattern found on the rest of the Vapor models. The x1.0, while providing a fit and performance of a Vapor skate,  is geared toward the beginner or casual user. The senior  x1.0 can about found in the $70 price range, or about $60 for the junior.


 

Supreme TotalONE

The Supreme line

TotalONE -- Along with the Vapor APX, the TotalOne is one of the most advanced skate ever produced by Bauer. The skate has the ability for a fully custom fit, including a tongue that is customizable for stiffness. The TotalOne also features the TUUK fusion runner, which is lightweight yet durable. One who buys a pair of TotalOnes pays for the privilege. They cost in the area of $800.

ONE100 -- These Bauer skates also have the ability for what’s known as a 360-degree custom fit because of the ALIVE thermoformable material in the boot. The ONE100 is very similiar to the TotalONE, except it doesn’t have the customizable tongue and TUUK runner. The price point also is lower. This model can be found at most retailers for about $600 for the skates for seniors, $400 for the junior skates.

ONE80 -- A good choice for the skater who’s intermediate and advanced, a recreational player who wants a skate that can perform at high levels, if need be. For all that it offers, the ONE80 is more affordable than the other top Supreme models. The price is about $400 for the senior model, $270 for the junior model.

ONE60 -- This model is designed to be mid-level, offering a supportive boot and providing the performance suited to the casual player who can play at the intermediate level. Price: Around $180 for the senior version, $120 for the juniors.

ONE20 -- The ONE20 is the most affordable in the Supreme product line. They’re designed for those learning, or the casual skater who hasn’t advanced much further than beginner level. And it shows in the price: The ONE20 can be purchased at about $60, or $50 for the junior model.

Flexlite 4.0

The Flexlite line

Flexlite 4.0 -- These are the top of the line in the Flexlite offerings. The Flexlite line employs a molded structure and foams. That combination makes a quarter panel of the boot that flexes to allow for a more efficient use of the skater’s stride. In turn, the design increases speed and reduces fatigue. The Flexlight 4.0 sells for about $310 for senior models. The juniors cost about $225.

Flexlite 3.0 -- The quarter panel design in the 3.0  is the same as the 4.0. Also, the 3.0 also features the same metatarsel guard. At about $190 for the senior version, the 3.0 is more affordable than the higher-end model. It’s $90 for the juniors.

Flexlite 2.0 -- These are the entry-level skates of the Flexlite line. It still has some of the features of the other Flexlites, but at about $65, it is a value for skating novices. For the junior model, it’s about $55.